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Lighting II: Home

This library guide provides resources for finding Evidence-Based Research for Lighting II.

For more information on the research process, creating a topic, coming up with search strategies, and more, try the Library's Research Fundamentals Guide.

To find books, ebooks, and videos in the library catalog, start your search below. (Or check out a suggested reference text!)

Remember to check the table of contents or index to see if the book has a section that might be relevant to your research question. You won't usually find a whole book on your exact topic, and that's okay!

Use our catalog to find books, videos, and other resources in our collections.

Advanced Search

Reference Books

Efficient Lighting Applications and Case Studies
Interior Lighting for Designers
The Interior Design Reference and Specification
Lighting Design Basics
The Lighting Handbook

Suggested Databases

These are all library resources that can be particularly helpful for finding evidence-based research for lighting design. Use these to find shorter, professional, and specific articles.

Specalizied Resources

Sometimes you might need to try a more unique resource for your question. Here are a few suggestions. (Need more? Ask a Librarian!)

Is your research question related to health or medicine? Try:

Is your research question related to sustainability? Try:

Is your research question related to the consumer behaviors / values of certain demographics? Try:

Reminders

Come back to your research question -- is this source applicable?

Come back to your research question -- is this source appropriate?

How does the source use evidence? How do you know?

Evaluating sources

Ask yourself the following questions about the source, and your experience with the source.

The Source

  • What does it say / what is the main point?
  • Where was it published / posted?
  • When was it published / posted?
  • Who is the author / creator?
  • Why does it exist?
  • How does it incorporate evidence?

Beyond the Source

  • When was it changed?
  • Where did you access it?
  • What other information can you find about this topic?
  • Who's missing from the conversation?
  • Why do you need this information?
  • How did the information find you? How did you react?

Creative Commons License
The Source + Beyond the Source Evaluation Framework by DePaul University Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Created by Firouzeh Rismiller, Holly Cerney, Susan Shultz, Grace Spiewak, and Sveta Stoytcheva.

The Source and Beyond the Source

Creative Commons License
The Source + Beyond the Source Evaluation Framework by DePaul University Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. Created by Firouzeh Rismiller, Holly Cerney, Susan Shultz, Grace Spiewak, and Sveta Stoytcheva.

Citing Sources

Citation styles provide rules for formatting your citations or references. Although there are many different citation styles, those most commonly used by students at College of DuPage are American Psychological Association (APA), Modern Language Association (MLA), and Chicago/Turabian. The style you should use is usually determined by the discipline or course in which you are working. Ask your instructor what style is required or recommended.

Citing Sources: Information to Record

Although every citation style is different, there are some standard elements to record:

  • Title (of book or article and journal)
  • Author
  • Publication Date
  • Publisher or source
  • Start and end pages (for articles and book chapters)

For electronic sources such as Web pages, you should record this additional information:

  • The date you accessed the site
  • The digital object identifier (DOI) if there is one
  • The URL (Web address) if there is no DOI

Tools for Citing Sources

See our Citing Sources Guide, which will walk you through citing multiple sources in different styles.

Or, try Purdue Owl for a detailed guide to using different citation styles.

You can also use a Citation Manager, or, a tool for creating and organizing citations. A few suggestions are below:

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